Category Archives: Reviews

Book Review: White Trash Warlock by David R. Slayton

White Trash Warlock     

Author: David R. Slayton

Publisher: Blackstone Publishing

American release date:  October 13, 2020

Format/Genre/Length: Kindle/Fantasy/260 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

 

Adam Lee Binder of Oklahoma is on a mission to find the amoral warlock who is making and selling charms at the expense of the misery of members of other species. Being a practitioner of magic himself, Adam takes umbrage at this misuse of magical power, but his search is also a bit personal. He thinks the warlock just might be his dear old dad, long missing in action.

Adam lives in Oklahoma with his Aunt Sue, another practitioner, and has since his release from Liberty House, the cruelty-ridden mental institution where he was relegated as a teen by his older brother, Robert, with the assistance of their mother. Unable to handle Adam’s being different, they shut him away in what was essentially a hell-hole. No wonder he doesn’t exactly stay in close communication now that he’s out and on his own.

However an urgent text from his usually reticent brother sends Adam driving up to his brother’s home in Denver. Bobby’s wife, Annie, is… ill, for lack of a better word, and Bobby think he needs Adam’s expertise to deal with the situation. Looks like a family reunion is in the cards, as their mother, Tilla, is staying with Bobby too.

As far as witches go, well, Adam doesn’t consider himself a witch, and his power is somewhat lacking, but he does believe in patterns. The first mention of Denver came from a Saurian named Bill, the second is that Bobby lives in Denver. And the third has to do with a pool cue Adam is trying to find out about which apparently came from a pawn shop in Denver. So going to Denver becomes a no-brainer.

As Adam nears Denver in his beloved Cutlass, he sees quite the disturbing sight in the form of a large creature hovering above the city, with tendrils that reach into various places, including Bobby’s home.  Probably right into his wife, if what Adam suspects turns out to be true. This task is not going to be easily accomplished, and most likely Adam can’t do this alone. Might even have to talk to the elves about it, which he really doesn’t want to do, seeing as he has an ex who is an elf, one who ran out on him years before, breaking his heart.

Not to mention, elves can be… difficult to deal with.

Damn, life is so complicated.

I was given a copy of this book by my daughter-in-law, and I fell in love with it from the beginning.  In some ways, it reminds me of the Dresden Files, which I also happen to love. And happily this is just the first book in a series.

The writing is great. David Slayton has a deft touch with humor that I can relate to, and his characters come alive on the page. Even the ones you want to punch for being jackasses. Adam is not your typical warlock in that he considers himself to be white trash from Oklahoma, isn’t rich and doesn’t think of himself as particularly good-looking, not to mention that being locked up in a mental institution as a teenager has given him serious insecurity issues. But I think he’s great, and a much better person than he realizes. He just needs to find the right person who can convince him that he is worth loving. The story is very imaginative, and I love the different types of supernatural beings we get to see, including but not limited to Saurians, elves, leprechauns, and gnomes. And let’s not forget Death and death reapers. Throw in a little romance, and I’m in heaven.

The only criticism I can really make is that the book would have benefited from a little more careful editing, but that’s because I’m an editor and I notice these things. Most people wouldn’t. I look forward to reading more books in the series, whenever they are published.

Book Review: Blue Exorcist, Vol 24 by Kazue Kato

Blue Exorcist, Vol 24       

Author: Kazue Kato

Publisher: Viz Media

American release date: August 4, 2020

Format/Genre/Length: Paperback/manga/paranormal/234 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

Eighteen hours have passed since Yuri’s labor began and she is no closer to delivery than she was when it started. Because of the cradle barrier, medical experts are unable to give her an injection, and she is exhausted.  Not to mention that during this ordeal, the poor woman is on display, and there’s nothing anyone (meaning Shiro) can do about it. He is helpless to help her. Yuri pushes hard and manages to birth the first child, which has its own consequences. Poor Rin, an unseen silent witness to the events of the past, becomes convinced more than ever that he should never have been born.

Sir Pheles feels Rin’s pain and removes him to another place.

Meanwhile, aboard the airship Dominus Liminus, Yukio has been summoned by the commander, Lucifer, who informs him that his test results are back. While Yukio is not a demon, he is not exactly a normal human either. Yukio’s left eye shows signs of severe temptaint, which is probably why Satan is able to use the eye as a window onto Assiah.

Lucifer decides to play tour guide and takes Yukio around his airship. A set of twin pistols catches Yukio’s eye. Turns out they are the test type and prototype of the Armumahel gun and its power “has the same qualities as the black flame” they consider to be “the flame of Gehenna.” In a surprise move, Lucifer offers the guns to Yukio and he accepts.  However, Lucifer explains, before Yukio can wield both weapons, his arm needs to be repaired, which could take five or six weeks. But there is a way in which it could be done in only one day…

Lewin Light (aka Lightning) is on trial for his attack on Director Drac Dragelescu. Lightning attempts to tell them (including Arthur Angel) that Drac has been working for the enemy, working at producing clones of demons. That doesn’t go very well, so now it’s up to Suguro to find the proof of Lightning’s innocence. Is he up to the task?

Shima gives Yukio some confidential information and tells him to do with it what he will. Yukio can’t help but wonder which side Shima is on. Shima says he wonders the same thing about Yukio. But what Shima tells him about Lucifer constantly changing bodies makes sense and explains much. Also explains much about Dragulescu.

The evidence of Dragulescu’s perfidy comes a day late and a dollar short as the man has flown the coop. Meanwhile, Lucifer has allowed Yukio to witness the experiment involving so-called “chosen ones” for whom this is not their first time at the rodeo. And now Lucifer reveals the reason for wanting Yukio to be present at this time…

Shiemi finds herself among the Grigori as an honored guest and given a complete make-over. They refer to her as Lady Shiemi and her wish is their command. She is unsure of why she is there. And she makes an unexpected discovery…

I’ve been waiting a long time for this next volume, and it doesn’t disappoint. On the contrary, I am now impatient for the next one. I only hope the wait is shorter.

Rin is beginning to think he should never have been born, as if his birth was the cause of anything. I hope he gets over this soon. Yukio, on the other hand, has come back into my good graces. I should have known better. The jury is still out on Shima. Suguro is pretty awesome, and has been trained well by Lightning, who isn’t as useless as he often seems. Even Mephisto Pheles shows an uncanny knack for knowing where and when he is needed and what to do in any given situation.

I still feel bad for Yuri. She was used as a pawn for something that was none of her fault. The heart loves where it loves. Not enough Shiro in this volume, but that’s not unexpected. Important things are happening, I can’t wait to see what they are. Another great volume of Blue Exorcist!

Book Review: Bleach, Vol 27 by Tite Kubo

Bleach, Vol 27         

Author: Tite Kubo

Publisher: Viz Media

American release date: June 2, 2009

Format/Genre/Length: Paperback/Manga/Supernatural/200 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

 

Ulquiorra has taken Orihime hostage, capture while she is being escorted back to the World of the Living. Warning her that resistance is futile, he allows her to go to Kakura Town to say good-bye to one person, without being seen, and then she is to report to Hueco Mundo. Orihime agrees, rather than see anyone get hurt. And of course the one person she chooses to say good-bye to is Ichigo.

Meanwhile, the battle between the Soul Reapers and the Arrancars continues, following the arrival of Uruhara. Yammy thinks he’s killed Kiskue but the shop owner is a lot tougher than he’s given him credit for. And he’s a quick study. Fool me once, shame on you… but Kiskue won’t be fooled again.

Ichigo, along with Rukia,  is battling Grimmjow, and things aren’t going particularly well when Dutch Boy (Shinji) shows up, and he isn’t anything Grimmjow has ever seen before. And neither will he explain himself to the Arrancar, which infuriates him. But just as Dutch Boy lashes out with a Cero of his own, and it seems as if the tide has turned in their favor, the call comes to the Arrancars that the battle is and they are to return. Obviously a sign that their objective has been attained, ie the capture of Orihime, although the others don’t know that yet.

An exhausted Ichigo is taken home to recuperate and is totally unaware of Orihime’s arrival and her heartfelt good-bye in the middle of the night. But when Hitsugaya arrives the next morning and detects her spiritual pressure, that knowledge seems to change everything. Now the Soul Reapers will do nothing to assist in her rescue, claiming that she has joined Aizen et al of her own accord and is therefore a traitor. Rukia and the other Soul Reapers are ordered back to Soul Society immediately and the Captain General forbids Ichigo to help Orihime either, claiming he needs him for more important thing.

Like Ichigo’s going to listen to the old man when Orihime’s life is in danger.

Before he heads off to Hueco Mundo, Ichigo briefly returns to school and cuts ties with his friends for their own protection, then heads to the shop, suspecting Kiskue can help him get to Hueco Mundo. But rather than play Lone Ranger, it seems that Ichigo will have a couple of companions, who have been waiting for him to turn up. And they are not the only ones keeping Ichigo on their radar.

An interesting turn of events with the capture of Orihime. Now we finally understand just why Uruhara wanted to keep her from the battle, and it has nothing to do with her abilities or lack of, but it was done for her protection, knowing she will become a target of Aizen. See how well that worked out. Now is the time to find out what this seemingly fragile, mind-mannered, sweet young girl is truly made of. In order to survive Aizen and his cohorts in Hueco Mundo, it had best be something really strong.  Also interesting is her admission of her feelings when saying farewell to Ichigo.

Perhaps losing the support of the Soul Reapers – at least for now – was for the best, because that’s what is allowing Uryu to come along, providing the loophole in his agreement with his father which helped him regain his Quincy powers. But it seems that dear old Dad is not surprised, as even Isshin can tell.

In this volume, we get a little more of a glimpse into Kiskue as more than a comic relief character who happens to own a shop in the World of the Living.  Did you really think that was his only purpose? No, that man has a lot more to him, and a lot more we have to learn about him. You just don’t become a supplier to the Soul Reapers without having some sort of inside knowledge… maybe friends in high places?

The first arc of Bleach involved the saving of Rukia, and now on to the saving of Orihime. Not coincidentally, both rescues involve Aizen, the renegade Soul Reaper, who no longer has any redeeming values. That man is just bad to the bone. And more than a little egomaniacal and crazy. No telling what that kind of crazy will do, as it tends to want everything.

Another good volume of Bleach, setting the stage for what is coming, namely battle with Aizen and pals on their own turf. That can’t be good, surely, especially when he was so many bad things at his disposal. So what is his long-term agenda?  Well, he still has the Hogyoku, waiting for it to come to fruition. What’s he plan to do with it? Hard to say.

Can’t wait for the next volume.

Book Review: Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill

Heart-Shaped Box     

Author: Joe Hill

Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks

American release date:  January 1, 2009

Format/Genre/Length: Paperback/Ghost Fiction/400 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

Jude Coyne, at the age of fifty-four, isn’t exactly in his prime. Not so much as the number of his years but the way he’s spent them. Jude is, or was, a hard-living death-metal rocker who likes to live life on the edge.  But he hasn’t made any new music for a while, not since most of his band have died. Doesn’t mean he’s changed his ways. He’s living in a farmhouse with a young girl thirty years his junior, who he calls Georgia. Not because that’s her name but because that’s where she’s from. He’s always called his girls by their states of origin, rather than bothering to learn their real names.  That’s just how Jude is.

Jude has a taste for the macabre, and possesses rather an esoteric collection of strange items, including a cookbook for cannibals, a used hangman’s noose, and a snuff film. So when he receives an invitation to purchase something strange and unusual, he decides to give the item a look. Imagine his surprise to discover a ghost for sale on a wannabe ebay site? How can he resist? He doesn’t, and makes a snap judgment to buy it now, so no one else can purchase it. The ghost arrives in the form of a suit, packed in a heart-shaped box. And now the fun begins.

When Jude receives the suit, his life changes forever. He will have to deal with his past in order to survive the present… or he may have no future.

This is not my first Joe Hill rodeo. He’s a really good writer, reminiscent of Stephen King. Not surprising, considering that’s his father. But that isn’t to say he’s an imitation of his father, because he isn’t. Far from it. Joe Hill knows how to tell a good story, and he tells it well. He can even take an outwardly unlikeable character like Jude Coyne and layer him in such a way that by the end of the book, you like him and are rooting for him. He draws on a vast knowledge of humankind and creates some memorable characters, including the ghost. He doesn’t sugarcoat his characters, and shows them with all their blemishes and flaws.

This book is a real page-turner, as you just can’t imagine what is going to happen, or what’s waiting up ahead on the road, and you’re really excited to find out what’s there. If you like ghost stories, you’ll love this one. Going to find more of his books and read them.

Book Review: How to Catch a Queen: Runaway Royals #1 by Alyssa Cole

How to Catch a Queen: Runaway Royals #1   

Authors: Alyssa Cole

Publisher: Avon

American release date: December 1, 2020

Format/Genre/Length: Kindle/Multicultural Romance/384 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

Shanti has wanted to be a queen for all of her life. That has been her goal, and to attain that end she has worked very hard, enlisting the aid of her parents in the realization of her dream, and registering with the matchmaking site RoyalMatch.com. But the road she has chosen to travel is not an easy one, and many have scoffed at her for their perceptions of what they consider a foolish fantasy. But Shanti is nothing if not stubborn, and refuses to allow herself to be derailed from her journey. Her reasons for wanting to become a queen are clear to her, even if not to everyone else—she wants to make a difference, to be a force for good, to wield royal power in a helpful way. Her desires have nothing to do with money or glory… or even a king.

Prince Sanyu is the heir to the throne of the kingdom of Nyaza. His father, Sanyu I, helped to reinstate the monarchy after driving out the Liechtienbourger colonizers, with the aid of his chief adviser and closest friend, Musoke. But that was a long time ago, and things are not going well. The king and his adviser have proven resistant to change, keeping their country mired in the traditions of the past, and refusing to entertain ideas concerning progress, or alliances with other countries. The trouble is that the king is dying, and soon Sanyu will sit upon the throne, and the very thought terrifies him. But even more troubling is that they have decided he needs to marry first. Marriages in Nyaza are different than in other places. Each time the king marries, there is a four month trial period, during which it is decided whether his wife is the True Queen or not. If not, then at the end of the trial period, she leaves and the process begins again. Sanyu has lost count of how many queens have come and gone, including his own mother, of whom he has no memories. And now they have chosen a wife for him from an online site? How can that end well?

Shanti is excited to have been chosen as the wife of the prince of Nyaza, even though relations between Nyaza and her home of Thesolo aren’t necessarily the best. She is determined to be the best queen ever. What does it matter that once she meets Sanyu, despite his less than warm attitude, she finds him desirable? That is immaterial. And it quickly becomes problematic, as he makes no move to get to know her. Shanti quickly learns there is a reason why there have been so many queens, and no True Queen. She is practically invisible inside her own home, unseen and unheard. How can she make a difference when no one listens to her? Maybe if she can put her finger on the pulse of the people… When she discovers the group Nyaza Rise Up, she rejoices to be able to offer them some of her great organizational and research skills. But is she secretly plotting with people to wish to harm her kingdom? How can that possibly endear her to her husband… or is that a lost cause anyway?

How to Catch a Queen is the first book in Alyssa Cole’s Runaway Royals series. It’s also related to the Reluctant Royals series, so look for some familiar characters. I have to admit that I loved this book from the start and devoured it in record time. Shanti is an amazing woman, strong, beautiful, intelligent, and with a mind and will of her own. What’s not to like? Sanyu had to grow on me because he appeared to be so weak and there were times I just wanted to shake him. But the nice thing about Alyssa Cole is that she makes her characters real. Even good people have weaknesses and faults, and those perceived as bad aren’t necessarily bad but misguided and simply human.

After Shanti, I loved Kenyatta, her guardswoman, who is strong and brave and not afraid to put a man in his place, even if he is a king. I hope she gets her own love story someday. I loved seeing some of the people I grew to love from the first series, especially Prince Johann, who has a special place in my heart.

This is a romance, without a doubt, but it’s also about friendship and family, and about standing up for what is right, and wielding the power you have to help those in your community, as well as the rest of the world. Everything just resonated with me. And I confess that no one makes me cry quite like Alyssa Cole does, tears of happiness and joy, and the satisfaction of having finished an extraordinarily good read.

Is anyone surprised that I’ve pre-ordered the second book in the series, which comes out next May? Once you read this one, I know you will too.

Book Review: Mexican Gothic by SIlvia Moreno-Garcia

Mexican Gothic   

Author: Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Publisher: Del Rey

American release date:  June 30, 2020

Format/Genre/Length: Hardback/Gothic/Historical Fantasy/320 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer:  Julie Lynn Hayes

Noemi is a pretty girl who likes to party and to socialize, happy to show off her extensive wardrobe of beautiful clothes. She’s attracted many suitors, but isn’t serious about any of them, including her latest, Hugo Duarte. She’s as fickle with her studies, having changed majors a few times, unsure what she wants to do. But when her father requests that she check on her recently wed cousin, Catalina, after receiving a disturbing letter from her, she reluctantly agrees to go. Catalina’s marriage was both shockingly sudden and secretive, and no one has even met the groom, Virgil Doyle. And now Catalina appears to be in distress, so what else can Noemi do?

Noemi travels by train to the home of her cousin and her new family. Known as High Place, it’s in a remote location, far from Mexico City. The house is huge, and at one time perhaps elegant, but now it is dark and forbidding and decaying. Besides Catalina and her husband, the other residents of the house are Virgil’s father, Howard Doyle, and Virgil’s aunt, Florence and her son, Francis.

Florence is buttoned-up and strict, and doesn’t hesitate to spell out the rules to Noemi, many of which seem ridiculous. No hot baths, only cold? No smoking? No using the car or leaving the house without permission or alone? Limited access to Catalina, who apparently sleeps a lot – doctor’s orders.  Is this a home or a prison?

Noemi tries to make sense of what is happening with Catalina, and thinks she may need psychiatric assistance. Not to mention a different physician, or at least a second opinion. The things her cousin says about the walls talking to her, and seeing things… this could be serious, beyond the ken of the family doctor, whom she doesn’t trust.

The house is dark and gloomy, a condition exacerbated by a dearth of light bulbs. But the inhabitants seem not to notice. The only person Noemi feels able to talk to, outside of Catalina, is Francis. But he’s so pale and weak, especially when compared to Catalina’s husband, Virgil, who is exceptionally good-looking. But there is something about Virgil that isn’t quite right either.

Can Noemi solve the mystery of High Place… or will it claim her and Catalina both?

Set in 1950 Mexico, this tale is both original and familiar. It kept me constantly guessing from beginning to end, wondering what was going on in this horrible place. And in the end, I wasn’t even close. Noemi might be a somewhat entitled heroine, and far from perfect, but she is engaging, and has spirit enough to match any traditional gothic heroine. I liked her as much as I disliked most of the inhabitants of High Place.

I will definitely have to read more of this author’s works, this is an amazing novel. I kept thinking it would make a great movie or series, and then I read that it is in development as a Hulu series, so keep your eye out for that. I know I will!

This is a must-read for those who love gothic novels and horror stories and appreciate twists. A definite page-turner.

Book Review: Ring Shout by P. Djèli Clark

Ring Shout   

Author: P. Djèli Clark

Publisher: Tordotcom

American release date:  October 13, 2020

Format/Genre/Length: Hardback/Historical Fantasy/192 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

 

1920s Macon Georgia is a time filled with prejudice and hate… and filled with the evil that is the Ku Klux Klan. But there is something not right about these Ku Kluxers, other than the obvious. Some of them are not what they seem, demons in human form, inhuman incarnations of hate. But Maryse Boudreaux can see them for what they are. And she has a sword that can whup them real good. And lots of friends who feel the same way and want nothing more than to send these misbegotten demons back to where they came, if not worse.

Now they’re about to re-release that damned movie, that Birth of a Nation, that stirred up so much trouble, so much hate, and so much violence, the first time it saw the light of day. There’s trouble brewing in the air, and Maryse isn’t about to sit back and let it be… she’s going to do something about it, no matter what the cost… and no matter how terrified she is of what’s coming.

I literally drank in this book in just a couple of days, a fascinating, brilliant tale that combines history with fantasy, and introduces us to some damn memorable characters. I cried at the end. Was it relief or sorrow? Read the book and find out for yourself.

This is my first book by this author, but it won’t be the last. He writes with a rich colorful language that sings, much like Maryse’s sword, and it’s filled with people you won’t soon forget. Even hateful ones, like Butcher Clyde. I look forward to reading more of his work.

Book Review: In the Miso Soup by Ryu Murakami

In the Miso Soup   

Author: Ryu Murakami

Publisher: Penguin Books

American release date:  March 28, 2006

Format/Genre/Length: Paperback/Psychological Fuctuib/224 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

 

Twenty-year-old Kenji works as a guide for tourists who come to Tokyo and wish to enjoy the seamier side of the city. He knows the “best” places to go to get the most bang for your buck and which places to avoid, no matter what it is you’re looking for. He knows what women do what for how much, and he is also a translator, speaking English pretty well.  But there’s something about this tourist, the American named Frank, that is frankly off-putting, although Kenji can’t put his finger on just what it is. On the surface, he seems like a regular guy. But then, at times, there is… the Face.

Frank is… for lack of a better word, different.

Maybe it’s just a coincidence, but Kenji has been reading about the recent deaths of young women. A serial killer is on the loose. Could Frank be the guy they’re looking for? And is Kenji in more danger than he’s ever been in before?

This is one heck of a ride, a great read from beginning to end. I was never sure how this one was going to turn out until the very end. Murakami is great at digging into his characters’ very souls, and making us question what is normal and what is not. Horror does not have to be in the form of a chainsaw-wielding maniac or a guy in a strange mask carrying an axe or knife. Horror can look like an average Joe. And it’s all the scarier for it.

I am really enjoying getting to know this author’s works and look forward to more. I recommend this to anyone who appreciates a good horror story.

Book Review: Bleach, Vol 26 by Tite Kubo

Bleach, Vol 26   

Author: Tite Kubo

Publisher: Viz Media

American release date: March 3, 2009

Format/Genre/Length: Paperback/Manga/Supernatural/2106 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer:  Julie Lynn Hayes

 

While communicating with the Soul Society from Kakura Town, Captain Hitsugaya is surprised to see Hinamori up and about. She apologizes to him for having doubted him, of having accused him of murdering Captain Aizen, since obviously that didn’t happen. Her only request is that he not kill Aizen now.

Renji is frustrated with Uruhara, who more or less tricked him into training Chad, but the training is not going smoothly. Ichigo is still training with the Visoreds when Orihime suddenly appears, much to their surprise. How did she even know how to find them when their location is so off the grid, and how did she slip through Hachi’s barrier? Orihime delivers to Ichigo the important message regarding Aizen’s plan, which includes the destruction of Kakura Town for his own nefarious ends (when are his ends not nefarious?) Uyru’s training with his father is not going very well either, and the man is pushing him to his limits.

When Kiskue calls for Orihime to come to the training grounds, she assumes that she is to train also. But his message is quite different—he tells her that she is stay out of this battle. Orihime understands, but is crushed, nonetheless. Rukia finds her and promised she will help her find a way to grow stronger.

In Hueco Mundo, Yammy has received a new arm, but Grimmjow hasn’t, which means he is no longer an Espada. Ulquiorra and Yammy are called by Aizen and told to carry out the order given by him a month before. They are also to take along the new Arrancar, Wonderweiss. In the Seireitei, Ukitake and Hisagi watch Rukia and Orihime train. Ukitake is pleased to see them together, as Rukia has few friends and finds it hard to let people in.

When the Arrancars drop from the sky, they are met by the Soul Reapers. Ichigo tells the Visoreds he has to go, against their better judgment. While they are thus engaged, Ulquiorra carries out his missions…

In this volume of Bleach, we get a little more insight into what the despicable Aizen has planned. I can’t believe Hinamori still defends him, in spite of what he did to her. She has a rude awakening ahead of her. Training for all our heroes is difficult, but no pain, no gain, right? The Visoreds are running out of patience with Ichicgo, especially as he keeps interrupting his training to step into the fray. Wait until he finds out what Aizen has done now. Or rather what he has sent his minions to do. Ichigo will lose his mind. He will not less this pass.

A lot going on in this volume, all a prelude to something that will be some time in the making and has just barely begun. Another great volume, can’t wait for 28!

Book Review: The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle

The Ballad of Black Tom     

Author: Victor LaValle

Publisher: Tordotcom

American release date: February 16, 2016

Format/Genre/Length: Paperback/dark fantasy/160 pages

Overall Personal Rating: ★★★★★

Reviewer: Julie Lynn Hayes

 

Tommy Tester is a dutiful son. He works hard to take care of his dying father, to provide them both with a place to live, food to eat… just the basics. But life is hard in Jazz Age New York, especially for a black man. There are places where he isn’t meant to go, things he can’t do. People who look down on him because of the color of his skin. But with survival the name of the game, sometimes you do things that are necessary. Even if they’re a little dark.

Take for instance the book that Tommy delivers to the white lady in Queens. He’s not stupid. He knows what kind of book that is, and what she is, and what someone like her will use it for. But that’s okay, he’s fixed it so she won’t be able to, and he’ll still get paid.

And then a strange white man calling himself Robert Suydam offers Tommy $500 to play at his home. Now Tommy plays the guitar, and  hesings, but he knows he isn’t all that, not like his dad, so what’s up with this offer? Still, that’s a whole lot of money, and he and his dad can live comfortably for a long time. His decision is a no-brainer. So he agrees to play, and receives $100 as a down payment.

Suddenly, he’s on someone’s radar—a cop and a private detective, who shake him down and want to know what his business is with Robert Suydam. He tells them what he knows, which isn’t much, and they take his money. Okay, now he’ll still get $400, and that is worth it. He spends a few days practicing his limited repertoire, and his dad teaches him a new song. And then the night comes and he goes to the mansion and plays…

This story is engaging from beginning to end, as you tear through it, trying to figure out what’s going to happen, and what’s going on. It’s told from two different perspectives, between Tommy Tester and Malone, the private detective. Nothing is what it seems, and I certainly didn’t see the ending coming. This is an old school horror story, harking back to writers such as HP Lovecraft.

Well-written and well-told, I truly enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to those who like to read horror stories, especially if you like HP Lovecraft.